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University of Portland Clark Library

Chicago Style (17th Edition) Citation Guide: How to Cite: Other

Formatting

Bibliography:

All citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Footnotes:

All citations should use first line indent, where the first line of the footnote should be indented by 0.5 inches; all subsequent lines are not indented.

Footnotes should be the same font size and style as the rest of your paper.

See instructions for how to insert footnotes in Microsoft Word.

Class Handouts

From Moodle:

Bibliography:

30 Minute Seder. "The Haggadah That Blends Brevity with Tradition." THE 205 A&B Course Website. Accessed September 19, 2017. https://learning.up.edu/moodle/pluginfile.php/767995/mod_resource/content/1/Haggadah.pdf.

Footnote:

1. 30 Minute Seder, "The Haggadah That Blends Brevity with Tradition," THE 205 A&B Course Website, accessed September 19, 2017, https://learning.up.edu/moodle/pluginfile.php/767995/mod_resource/content/1/Haggadah.pdf.


Print:

Bibliography:

Gray, George. "The Babylonian Creation Story (Enuma Elish)." Class handout, Theology 205, University of Portland, Portland, OR, September 5, 2017. 

Footnote:

1. George Gray, “The Babylonian Creation Story (Enuma Elish)" (class handout, Theology 205, University of Portland, Portland, OR, September 5, 2017), 2. 

Conference Proceedings or Presentation

Published Conference Proceedings

Bibliography:

Chang, Steve S., et al., editors. Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, February 12-15, 1999: General Session and Parasession on Loan Word Phenomena. Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Linguistics Society, 2000.

Footnote:

1. Steve Chang et al., eds, Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, February 12-15, 1999: General Session and Parasession on Loan Word Phenomena (Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Linguistics Society, 2000).


Oral Presentation at Conference

Bibliography:

Stein, Bob. “Reading and Writing in the Digital Era.” Paper presented at the Discovering Digital Dimensions, Computers and Writing Conference,  West Lafayette, IN, May 23 2003

Footnote:

1. Bob Stein, “Reading and Writing in the Digital Era.” (presentation, Discovering Digital Dimensions, Computers and Writing Conference, West Lafayette, IN, May 23, 2003).

Dissertations

Bibliography:

Richardson, Dionna D. "Purloined Subjects: Race, Gender, and the Legacies of Colonial Surveillance in the British Caribbean." PhD diss., University of Akron, 2019. https://login.uportland.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2322785001?accountid=14703.

Footnote:

1. Dionna D. Richardson, "Purloined Subjects: Race, Gender, and the Legacies of Colonial Surveillance in the British Caribbean" (PhD diss., University of Akron, 2019), 20, https://login.uportland.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/2322785001?accountid=14703.

Images / Artwork

Image from a Website

Bibliography:

Botticelli, Sandro. Madonna of the Eucharist. 1470. Oil on canvas. Accessed January 6, 2017. http://www.catholictradition.org/Galleries/gallery2-22.jpg.

Footnote:

1. Sandro Botticelli, Madonna of the Eucharist, 1470, oil on canvas, accessed January 6, 2017, http://www.catholictradition.org/Galleries/gallery2-22.jpg.


Image from a Book

When citing an image within a book, in your bibliography, cite the book in which you found the image.

In your footnote, cite information about the image as well as the book in which you located the image.

Bibliography:

Pearce, John. American Painting,1560-1913. New York: McGraw, 1964. 

Footnote:

1. Mary Cassatt. "Mother and Child," oil on canvas, 1889 (Wichita Art Museum, Wichita, KS), in American Painting,1560-1913 by John Pearce (New York: McGraw, 1964), slide 22. 


Image from a Library Database

Bibliography:

Bingham, George Caleb. Daniel Boone Escorting a Band of Pioneers. 1851. Oil on canvas. Washington University. https://library.artstor.org/asset/CARNEGIE_3940005.

Footnote:

1. George Caleb Bingham, Daniel Boone Escorting a Band of Pioneers, 1851, oil on canvas, Washington University, https://library.artstor.org/asset/CARNEGIE_3940005.

Lecture Notes (taken by a student or otherwise not public)

Bibliography:

Gray, George. “Genesis 1-3.” Class lecture, University of Portland, Portland, OR, September 24, 2018.

Footnote:

1. George Gray, "Genesis 1-3" (lecture, University of Portland, Portland, OR, September 24, 2018).

Music Scores

Bibliography:

Liszt, Franz. Hamlet: Symphonic Poem No. 10 for Full Orchestra. New York: Edition Eulenburg, 1960.

Footnote:

1. Franz Liszt, Hamlet: Symphonic Poem No. 10 for Full Orchestra (New York: Edition Eulenburg, 1960).

Personal/Unpublished Works/Blogs

Bibliography:

Brussat, Frederic. “Beyond Ideas of Wrongdoing and Rightdoing.” Civility & Spirituality (blog). December 11, 2014. http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/blogs/posts/civilityspirituality/301/beyond-ideas-of-wrongdoing-and-rightdoing.

Footnote:

1. Frederic Brussat, “Beyond Ideas of Wrongdoing and Rightdoing,” Civility & Spirituality (blog), December 11, 2014, http://www. spiritualityandpractice.com/ blogs/posts/civility-spirituality/301/beyond-ideas-of-wrongdoing-and-rightdoing.

Podcasts

Bibliography:

Flax-Clark, Aidan. “Stonewall 50: The Sound of Memory.” Library Talks. June 23, 2019. Podcast, MP3 audio, 49:24. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/stonewall-50-the-sound-of-memory/id804982781?i=1000442439582.

Footnote:

1. Aidan Flax-Clark, “Stonewall 50: The Sound of Memory," June 23, 2019 in Library Talks, podcast, MP3 audio, 25:22, https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/stonewall-50-the-sound-of-memory/id804982781?i=1000442439582.

PowerPoint Slides

Bibliography:

Gray, George. "Week 2: Exodus." PowerPoint presentation, Theology 205, University of Portland, Portland, OR, September 3, 2017. 

Footnote:

1. George Gray, “Week 2: Exodus" (PowerPoint presentation, Theology 205, University of Portland, Portland, OR, September 5, 2017).

Review of Book, Play, Movie, Poem, etc.

Bibliography:

Prestwich, Michael. Review of Chivalry in Medieval England by Nigel Saul. The American Historical Review 118, no. 1 (2013): 235-36. https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/118.1.235.

Footnote:

1. Michael Prestwich, review of Chivalry in Medieval England by Nigel Saul, The American Historical Review 118, no. 1 (2013): 235, https://doi.org/10.1093/ahr/118.1.235.

Song or Album

Music citations may begin with either the artists's name or the name of the composer, depending on the focus of the recording.  Include the date of the recording, the published date, or both.  The footnote may begin with the title of the song rather than the artist's name.

Spotify

Bibliography:

Chanticleer. "Shenandoah." Track 11 on I Have Had Singing: A Chanticleer Portrait. Chanticleer Records, 1994, Spotify. 

Footnote:

1. “Shenandoah,” track 11 on Chanticleer, I Have Had Singing: A Chanticleer Portrait, Chanticleer Records, 1994, Spotify.


CD

Bibliography:

Ellington, Duke. All Star Road Band. With Duke Ellington Orchestra. Recorded May 31, 1964. Signature/CBS Special Products, 1989, compact disc.

Footnote:

1. Duke Ellington, All Star Road Band, with Duke Ellington Orchestra, recorded May 31, 1964, Signature/CBS Special Products, 1989, compact disc.

Sound Recordings from Naxos Music Library

Bibliography:

“Kyrie.” Mass for Four Voices. Composed by William Byrd. Performed by Oxford Camerata. 1992. Streaming music, 2:25. https://portland.nml3.naxosmusiclibrary.com/ catalogue/8.550574.

Footnote:

1. Kyrie,” in Mass for Four Voices, composed by William Byrd, performed by Oxford Camerata, 1992, streaming music, 1:10, https://portland.nml3.naxosmusiclibrary.com/ catalogue/8.550574.

Statista

Bibliography:

Pew Research Center. "United States: Believe in God or a Higher Power in 2017, by Age Group." Chart. January 11, 2019. Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/955432/united-states-belief-in-god-by-age/.

Footnote:

1. Pew Research Center, "United States: Believe in God or a Higher Power in 2017, by Age Group," chart, January 11, 2019, Statista, https://www.statista.com/statistics/955432/united-states-belief-in-god-by-age/.

Twitter (Tweets)

Write out the actual Tweet in the citation and keep spelling and grammar the same as in the original, even if there are errors. When quoting the Tweet, beside grammatical and spelling errors in the original Tweet, write [sic] in square brackets to indicate the errors are not your own. E.g., if the Tweet was "It isn't you're fault the media is violent", write: "It isn't you're [sic] fault the media is violent."  Only include the time stamp if it is relevant or if you are citing multiple citations on the same day.

Bibliography:

Athar, Sohaib (@ReallyVirtual). "Helicopter hovering above Abbottad at 1AM is a rare event." Twitter, January 4, 2013. https://twitter.com/reallyvirtual/status/64780730286358528?lang=en.

Footnote:

1. Sohaib Athar (@ReallyVirtual), "Helicopter hovering above Abbottad at 1AM is a rare event," Twitter, January 4, 2013, https://twitter.com/reallyvirtual/status/64780730286358528?lang=en.

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