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University of Portland Clark Library

Chicago Style (17th Edition) Citation Guide: Books & Ebooks

Formatting

Bibliography:

All citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Footnotes:

All citations should use first line indent, where the first line of the footnote should be indented by 0.5 inches; all subsequent lines are not indented.

Footnotes should be the same font size and style as the rest of your paper.

See instructions for how to insert footnotes in Microsoft Word.

Tips

Authors/Editors

An author can be a person but can also be an organization, or company. These are called group or corporate authors.

If you are citing a chapter from a book that has an editor, the author of the chapter is listed first, and is the name listed in the in-text citation.

Titles

Capitalize the first letter of every important word in the title. You do not need to capitalize words such as: in, of, or an.

If there is a colon (:) in the title, include what comes after the colon (also known as the subtitle).

Dates

The format of all dates is: Month Date, Year. e.g. September 5, 2012.

Whether to give the year alone or include a month and day depends on your source: write the full date as you find it there.

If no date is listed, use the abbreviation n.d. for "no date." 

Access Date

Chicago style does not recommend including access dates in the citation, unless no date of publication for the source may be located.

Book In Print

One Author

Bibliography:

Kling, David William. The Bible in History: How the Texts Have Shaped the Times. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Footnote:

1. David William Kling, The Bible in History: How the Texts Have Shaped the Times (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 301.


Two or Three Authors

Bibliography:

Jacobson, Diane L., and Robert Kysar. A Beginner's Guide to the Books of the Bible. Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1991.

Footnote:

1. Diane L. Jacobson and Robert Kysar, A Beginner's Guide to the Books of the Bible (Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1991), 151.


Four to Ten Authors

For sources with four to ten authors, list all authors in the bibliography; in the footnote, list only the first author’s name followed by the phrase et al. (Latin for “and others”)

Bibliography:

 Evans, Julie, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain. Equal Subjects, Unequal Rights:
             Indigenous Peoples in British Settler Societies. 
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003.

Footnote:

1. Julie Evans et al., Equal Subjects, Unequal Rights: Indigenous Peoples in British Settler Societies (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003), 52.


More than Ten Authors

For sources with more than ten authors, list the first seven authors in the bibliography, followed by et al.. In the footnote, list only the first author's name followed by et al..

eBook

Bibliography:

Holder, Arthur G. Christian Spirituality: The Classics. New York: Routledge, 2009. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/up/detail.action?docID=446822.

Footnote:

1. Arthur G. Holder, Christian Spirituality: The Classics (New York: Routledge, 2009), 30, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/up/detail.action?docID=446822.

Book with Editor(s) but no Author

Print Book:

Bibliography:

Richard, Lucien, editor. What are They Saying about the Theology of Suffering? New York: Paulist Press, 1992.

Footnote:

1. Lucien Richard, ed., What are They Saying about the Theology of Suffering? (New York: Paulist Press, 1992), 20.


Online Book:

Bibliography:

Kidwell, Jeremy, and Sean Doherty, editors. Theology and Economics: A Christian Vision of the Common Good. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. https://login.uportland.idm.oclc.org/login?url= http://link.springer.com/10.1057/9781137536518.

Footnote:

1. Jeremy Kidwell and Sean Doherty, eds., Theology and Economics: A Christian Vision of the Common Good (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), 103, https://login.uportland.idm.oclc.org/login?url= http://link.springer.com/10.1057/9781137536518.

Translated Book

Print Book:

Bibliography:

Boitani, Piero. The Bible and Its Rewritings. Translated by Anita Weston. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Footnote:

1. Piero Boitani, The Bible and Its Rewritings, trans. Anita Weston (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 89.


Online Book:

Bibliography:

Augustine. The Confessions of St. Augustine. Translated by Edward Bouverie Pusey. Waiheke Island, New Zealand: Floating Press, 1921. https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/up/detail.action?docID=349865.

Footnote:

1. Augustine, The Confessions of St. Augustine, trans. by Edward Bouverie Pusey (Waiheke Island, New Zealand: Floating Press, 1921), 65, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/up/detail.action?docID=349865.

Chapters, Short Stories, Essays, or Articles From a Book (Anthology or Collection)

Bibliography:

Deffenbaugh, Daniel G. and David L. Dungan. “The Bible and Ecology.” In The International Bible Commentary, edited by William R. Farmer, 314-323. Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1998.

Footnote:

1. Daniel G. Deffenbaugh and David L. Dungan, “The Bible and Ecology,” in The International Bible Commentary, ed. William R. Farmer (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1998), 315.

An Introduction, Preface, Foreword, or Afterword

When citing an introduction, a preface, a foreword, or an afterword, write the name of the author(s) of the piece you are citing. Then give the name of the part being cited, which should not be italicized or enclosed in quotation marks; in italics, provide the name of the work and the page range. Finish the citation with the details of publication.

Bibliography:

Shepard, Paul. Introduction to Nature and Madness, 24-41. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998.

Footnote:

1. Paul Shepard, introduction to Nature and Madness (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998), 35.


If the writer of the piece is different from the author of the complete work, then start the citation with the author of the introduction or foreword, and write the full name of the principal work's author after the title of the work. 

Bibliography:

Sacks, Oliver. Foreword to A Man without Words, by Susan Schaller, 9-12. 2nd ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012.

Footnote:

1. Oliver Sacks, foreword to A Man Without Words, by Susan Schaller, 2nd ed. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012), 10.

Article in a Reference Book (e.g. Encyclopedias, Dictionaries)

For reference books that provide content in alphabetical order, in the footnote, use s.v. (Latin for “sub verbo) before the title of the entry that you are citing. (If you are citing more than one title, use the plural form, s.vv.). Publisher information does not need to be included in the footnote.

Print Reference Book:

Bibliography:

Camelot, P. T. "Ephesus." In The New Catholic Encyclopedia, edited by William J. McDonald, vol. 5, 457-458. New York: McGraw Hill, 1967.

Footnote:

1. The New Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Ephesus.”


Online Reference Book:

Include a publication date or last updated date if available; otherwise, include an access date.

Bibliography:

Hunt, M. J. "Red Sea." In The New Catholic Encyclopedia, 2nd ed., vol. 11, 962-963. Detroit, MI: Gale, 2003. https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/CX3407709364/GVRL?u=port18814&sid=GVRL&xid=c11723f0.

Footnote:

1. The New Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Red Sea,” https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/CX3407709364/GVRL?u=port18814&sid=GVRL&xid=c11723f0.

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